Home » Blog » Step by Step Guide to Making Ghee in the Crockpot

Step by Step Guide to Making Ghee in the Crockpot

5 from 1 vote

This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy.

Ghee is often thought of as one of the healthiest cooking fats around. Learn to make your own ghee in the crockpot step by step.

ghee in canning jar

What is Ghee?

Ghee is a shelf stable way of storing butter.

It is much like clarified butter, but it gets cooked just a little longer.

It has been used all over the world for thousands of years, although it’s best known for being used in recipes from India.

Not only is it shelf stable, but it also has a high smoke point, higher than butter.

And that, my friends, makes it perfect for frying without burning.

For a comparison of different fats and what they are best suited for, you can go here.

When I can’t make my own butter, I look for sales on the organic butter at my local grocery store. 

Of course, the best ghee will come from the best butter. And the best butter comes from grass-fed cows.

I use about 6 pounds at a time when I make it in my crockpot.

Using the crockpot is the easiest way I have found for making ghee.

Crockpots have a low and constant temperature which is exactly what you need.

People always ask, so this is the crockpot I love and use.

The process is quite simple really.

As the butter melts it releases the milk solids and water.

As it continues to heat, the water evaporates and the milk solids cook to a golden brown.

Cooking the milk solids gives the ghee a wonderful nutty flavor.

The oil is separated out from the milk solids and you are left with liquid gold.

You can use ghee just like you would use butter.

Spread it on toast.

Pop it on a baked potato.

Scramble your eggs in it.

Make a pie crust with it.

Sourdough Cornbread, anyone?

Have I mentioned that you can even use it to fry things?

Ready to give it a try?

Let’s go!

liquid ghee in canning jars on counter

Making Ghee in Your Crockpot

This isn’t really a ghee recipe, as such. But I’ve put all the instructions into a recipe card at the end of the post.

Ingredients

  • 6 pounds unsalted butter OR
  • 6 pounds cultured butter

Equipment

Unwrap your butter and place it into the crockpot.

Leave the cover off and turn it to low.

Allow all the butter to melt. The amount of time this takes will depend on how much you are making. I usually do 6 pounds at a time.

After the butter is completely melted, continue heating it on low.

sticks of butter in crockpot
ready for the sauna

After a while you will begin to have distinct layers in the crockpot. Water, oil, and milk solids, with some sediment at the bottom.

A white foam will form on the top, so you won’t be able to see the other layers, but they’re there!

foam on top of melted butter
floaty bits nicely browned

The butter needs to simmer long enough for the water to evaporate. That’s why you don’t put the lid on. And you want the layer on the top to get a nicely browned.

It usually takes about 8 hours, but it’s taken as long as 12 on occasion.

The next step is to skim off the solids on the top.

skimming off the floaty bits
skimming the floaty bits

These floaty bits can be used to butter just about anything you want.

It will have a slightly nutty taste, just like the ghee does. And if you’ve used salted butter, it’s going to be quite salty.

Now you will be able to see if all the water has evaporated. If it hasn’t continue to simmer the butter until it’s gone.

When you are satisfied that all the water has evaporated, it’s time to turn off the crockpot.

melted butter in the crockpot after skimming
checking if the water has evaporated

Straining Your Ghee

Use hot, sterile glass jars with lids to store your homemade ghee.

I, of course, use canning jars.

Pints to be exact. 🙂

Put a couple of layers of butter muslin, several layers of cheesecloth, or use a clean pillow case in a fine mesh sieve over the jars to strain out any sediment.

Now carefully ladle out the oil into sterilized glass jars. Try not to disturb the layer of sediment on the bottom.

ladling ghee through butter muslin into jars
ladling into hot, sterile jars

As the ghee cools it will solidify and turn a lovely shade of buttercup yellow.

Cover the jars loosely and allow to cool.

cooled ghee in canning jars.
cooled off and beautiful!

Storing Ghee

After the ghee has cooled completely, put the lids on the jars tightly.

Ghee can be stored at room temperature for 2 to 3 months, depending on your room temperature.

It can also be stored in the fridge or in another cool, dry place (like a root cellar) for up to a year.

So next time you are making chicken fried steak, or making a sourdough pie crust, give ghee a try and see how you like it!

gee in a jar with a wooden spoon on top

Frequently Asked Questions About Homemade Ghee

How long does ghee last?

Homemade ghee will last for about 3 months in the kitchen. It will last up to a year stored in an airtight container in a cool, dry area.

Should you refrigerate ghee?

Homemade ghee does not have to be refrigerated. But it doesn’t hurt it if you want to put it in the fridge. The cold will cause it to harden more.

What is ghee used for?

Ghee is mostly known for Indian cooking and recipes. But you can actually use it anywhere you would use a solid fat like shortening, lard, or butter. Pie crusts and cornbread are two places I use ghee a lot.
Ghee has a high smoke point, so it’s also great for stir fry and other high temperature cooking, like frying potatoes. It gives you the same taste as butter, but it doesn’t burn.
You can also just use it to spread on toast or muffins just like you would butter.

More homemade pantry items for you to try:

ghee in pint canning jar

Ghee

Ghee is often thought of as one of the healthiest cooking fats around. Learn to make your own ghee in the crockpot step by step.
5 from 1 vote
Cook Time 8 hrs
Cooling Time 1 hr
Total Time 9 hrs
Course Pantry Staple
Cuisine International
Servings 6 pints
Calories 3252 kcal

Equipment

  • crockpot
  • fine mesh strainer
  • cheese cloth or butter muslin
  • ladle
  • storage containers with airtight lids

Ingredients
  

  • 6 pounds unsalted butter OR
  • 6 pounds cultured butter

Instructions
 

  • Unwrap your butter and place it into the crockpot. Leave the cover off and turn it to low.
  • Allow all the butter to melt. The amount of time this takes will depend on how much you are making. I usually do 6 pounds at a time. After the butter is completely melted, continue heating it on low.
  • After a while you will begin to have distinct layers in the crockpot. Water, oil, and milk solids, with some sediment at the bottom.
  • Continue to simmer until the water evaporates and the the layer on top is nicely browned. 8 to 12 hours (or overnight)
  • Skim the solids off the top and check if the water has evaporated. If it hasn’t continue to simmer until it’s gone.
  • Ladle the ghee into hot, sterilized glass jars through a double layer of butter muslin. Try not to disturb the layer of sediment on the bottom.
  • Cover the jars loosely and allow to cool.
  • After the ghee has cooled completely, put the lids on the jars tightly and store.

Notes

Ghee can be stored at room temperature for 2 to 3 months, depending on your room temperature.
It can also be stored in the fridge or in another cool, dry place (like a root cellar) for up to a year.

Nutrition

Serving: 1pintCalories: 3252kcalCarbohydrates: 0.3gProtein: 4gFat: 368gSaturated Fat: 233gPolyunsaturated Fat: 14gMonounsaturated Fat: 95gTrans Fat: 15gCholesterol: 975mgSodium: 50mgPotassium: 109mgSugar: 0.3gVitamin A: 11335IUCalcium: 109mgIron: 0.1mg
Keyword crockpot, ghee
Tried this recipe?Let us know how it was!
By on September 6th, 2022

Leave a Comment

Recipe Rating




This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.